BMW CAFE RACER e CUSTOM BIKES

Este é o espaço para quem quiser trocar impressões sobre modelos da BMW

Moderadores: Rui Viana, pedropcoelho, amandio, JoseMorgado, MHQC

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Localização: Oslo, Norway
MensagemEnviado: 05 Jun 2015 06:29
Ron Wood Racing Califórnia, USA

F800GS - BMW FLAT TRACKER


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A couple of years ago, BMW USA took the Rotax engine from an F 800 and gave it to legendary flat track builder Ron Wood. Wood obliged by building this exquisite machine, and on its very first competitive outing, it finished in sixth place.

The F 800 was the loudest bike on the track: the AMA race announcer reported that the BMW “sounded like a bear coming out of his den for the first time”. But aside from the exhaust system, the motor in this bike is mostly stock, and it even retains the electric start.


Fonte: Bike EXIF

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E este é o homem responsável por esta máquina Ron Wood

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Amândio de Aveiro
(da Madeira, que já esteve em Oeiras e agora em Oslo)
R1150 GS [2002-2013]
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Registado: 21 Abr 2008 12:05
Localização: Oslo, Norway
MensagemEnviado: 05 Jun 2015 06:39
Ellaspede West End in Brisbane, Australia

1980 BMW R65


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Given the current popularity of BMW’s R series bikes, one would be forgiven thinking there must be something about owning an Air Head…
Our latest client, Sandy, certainly thought so when he purchased this early ’80’s BMW R65. The bike had already undergone some mods and seemed to be in reasonable condition.

The plan was to extend the theme that had already been started with the previous mods and fully explore a cafe racer look.
Sandy wanted a project that he and his son Alex could get involved with… something that was fun. They already had off-road and adventure bikes, so to get a road-going rig was another attraction of the R65.

The previous mods included a seat sub-frame made from tree-trunk-sized tubing, an engineer- passed custom rear mono-shock suspension set-up, mufflers, clip-ons and a digital gauge with keyless start.

After stripping the bike we realised the seat subframe wasn’t following the same line as the rest of the bike. Some doctoring had it back on the straight and narrow allowing us to make a custom seat pan to suit.

Sandy asked if we could soften the custom suspension somewhat as it tended to ‘buck’ a bit over bumps. Some internal pre-load work by our local suspension specialist sorted that out with the ride now feeling more compliant and conducive to staying in the saddle.

Mechanically the bike was sound but for good measure kits were put through the Bing carbs along with new foam pod filters.

The engine was cleaned up and touched up with paint to freshen the look, as was the frame and all associated items.

The paint scheme was a combination of Sandy’s thoughts and ours. It seems to draw some inspiration from 1970’s Martini race team liveries, whilst not copying directly. (Knee pads will complete the theme, when they arrive).

Front guard is the original, trimmed, whilst the rear is a custom made unit. An Ellaspede Ninja Star mounts the number plate at the rear (which we’re told is soon to be a black n white personalised unit).

The new seat was shaped to suit the styling of the bike and finished in vinyl with light blue contrast stitch. The 65 is self-explanatory.

What isn’t so obvious are custom name plates replacing the fork leg reflectors. These subtle CNC machined inserts reference a travel tale from Sandy’s past that he chose to incorporate into the build.

Headlight is aftermarket 7”, whilst the taillight is a flexible LED strip, frenched into the frame. Indicators are Posh Chamfers and a new Acewell 2853 gauge replaced the ageing former digital unit.

To ensure the electrics were reliable, a full re-wire was undertaken with aviation grade wire. Bar-end mirrors complete the front-end picture.

Wheels were cleaned and painted black with new Bridgestone tread applied… the rear 130/80 being the largest size the shaft drive swing arm would allow.

The mufflers were treated to new stainless tips and re-painted.

Whilst the 65 has a few kms under the belt, it’s delivering the air-head fun-factor that Sandy and son Alex were chasing… and turning many a head in the process.

Fonte: Ellaspede

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Amândio de Aveiro
(da Madeira, que já esteve em Oeiras e agora em Oslo)
R1150 GS [2002-2013]
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Registado: 21 Abr 2008 12:05
Localização: Oslo, Norway
MensagemEnviado: 05 Jun 2015 07:05
CAFE RACER DREAMS Madrid

1974 R90/6 - CRD#38


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Some custom motorcycles are so outlandish that they grab your attention immediately, while some are so understated and classy that, once you notice them, you can’t look away. Case in point: Cafe Racer Dreams‘ #38.

This stunning ’74 BMW R90/6 belongs to José Martín Espinosa, a prominent figure in the Spanish fashion industry. He commissioned this BMW cafe racer after a series of email conversations with CRD and a couple of visits to their Madrid headquarters, fully entrusting the creative direction to them.

The BMW’s stance has been altered by shortening the forks and swapping out the rear suspension for shorter-than-stock Hagon units. A shorter, hand crafted subframe supports the custom made seat. The battery has been relocated to underneath the swingarm, leaving the area behind the airbox free of clutter save for the ignition, which has been moved to under the seat.

Both fenders are stock BMW items—the original front fender has been adapted to fit the rear, and a R100 fender fitted to the front. Along with the tank, they’ve been sprayed a luxurious black with subtle white pinstriping—true to the original paint scheme. Bespoke fender braces add to the bike’s overall classic appeal, as do the crash bars and Firestone Deluxe Champion tyres.

CRD turned to their own catalog for finishing kit—the turn signals, tail light, Renthal Ultra-Low bars and mufflers can all be bought from their online store. The headlight is also a CRD unit, but it’s been modified to house a Motogadget speedometer and various controls. On the handlebar, Motogadget’s stealthy m-Switch units replace the standard BMW switches.

I once asked CRD’s Pedro García what his personal design philosophy was. His reply was: “Less is more, and pay full attention to the final finish.” In my opinion, CRD #38 is the epitome of this philosophy. An elegant vintage custom, with a host of finer details that only become apparent as you dig deeper.


Fonte: Bike EXIF
Site: CRD Motorcycles

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Amândio de Aveiro
(da Madeira, que já esteve em Oeiras e agora em Oslo)
R1150 GS [2002-2013]
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Direcção BMW McP
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Registado: 23 Jan 2008 21:41
Localização: Lisboa
MensagemEnviado: 05 Jun 2015 09:05
Bonitas motas!!

Esta última é muito interessante.
José Morgado
Sócio 237

R65 78
R100R 92
R1100RS 94
R1200RT 07
R90S 74
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MensagemEnviado: 05 Jun 2015 09:28
É mesmo.
João Paulo Teixeira de Matos
Sócio nº 494
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"The journey is the reward" Steve Jobs
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ER Motorcycles, Eslovénia

1964 R69S - Voltron


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It’s not easy to pick out Slovenia on a map. It’s a tiny, picture-postcard country just to the east of Italy, full of mountains and forests and rivers, and home to some of Europe’s best driving roads.

Slovenia is also home to ER Motorcycles, one of the fastest-rising stars on the custom scene. This is the latest build from Blaž Šuštaršič and his crew, and it confirms their place in the premier league.

The story of Voltron can be traced back to last year’s ‘Mobster,’ a BMW R80-engined custom with a strong vintage vibe. “After the success of the Mobster project we couldn’t resist the chance to do it all again—but this time in a different style,” says Blaž.

Mobster was all about the vintage BMW vibe, but Voltron propels it a few decades into the 21st century: It’s a clever, retro-futuristic mash-up of styles and eras. “We’ve used many of the ideas that were going through our heads when designing Mobster,” says Blaž, “but didn’t suit the vintage style.”

Voltron is a scrambler-meets-street-tracker hybrid, with an emphasis on clean lines and visual simplicity. It’s a much more ‘technical’ and ambitious build than Mobster, with more of a focus on the rider experience. “We also wanted to improve the maneuverability and the ergonomics, to make the rider feel even better.”

The core of the bike is a modified and cleaned-up 1964 R69S frame, upgraded with a liberal sprinkling of parts from the later R80 RT. That includes the engine, the complete front end, and the 18” wheels.

The transmission is a rebuilt five-speed BMW R100 unit, and the fuel tank is the famous R60/5 ‘Toaster’ design. A few modern components have been discreetly integrated, such as the Brembo calipers, Renthal bars and a whole raft of top-shelf Motogadget electrics—including the instrument, switchgear and an m-Unit master controller.

The distinctive upright shocks have been rebuilt with Hagon internals and the tires are Heidenau K60 Scouts—classic 50/50 dual sport rubber with an excellent reputation. Ancillaries include Tarozzi pegs and Ariette grips. Everything else is custom-made to an extraordinarily high standard.

There’s no question about the quality or the design vision here, but what about the name? “We wanted a name that sounds strong and has a futuristic flavor, to emphasize the bike’s modern features,” says Blaž. “Voltron was a giant robot from an old animated TV series, who fought evil forces as the Defender of the universe.

“For us, Voltron represents our most advanced build—fighting its way from past to future!”

If this is the future of custom motorcycle building, we reckon it looks pretty good.


Fonte: Bike EXIF
Facebook: ER Motorcycles
Site: ER Motorcycles

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Amândio de Aveiro
(da Madeira, que já esteve em Oeiras e agora em Oslo)
R1150 GS [2002-2013]
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Registado: 21 Abr 2008 12:05
Localização: Oslo, Norway
MensagemEnviado: 05 Jun 2015 10:50
Krugger Motorcycles, Basse-Bodeux, Bégica

K1600 2014 - KRUGGER K1600


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The BMW K1600 is a touring machine par excellence. It has six cylinders, seven computers, multiple drive modes and adaptive headlights. It’s the kind of machine that sends journalists into raptures, and wins Motorcycle Of The Year awards.

It is not, however, a bike that anyone in their right mind would want to customize. The suspension is fiendishly complex, the wiring loom puts the Space Shuttle to shame, and weight is somewhere on the wrong side of 700 pounds.

But if you’re Fred “Krugger” Bertrand, a K1600 is just another challenge. With an AMD World Championship under his belt, there’s not much that fazes Belgium’s leading motorcycle builder.

BMW Motorrad picked their man wisely for their latest custom project, and Krugger has rewarded their faith with a bike even more amazing than his 2010 ‘Veon’ Harley.

“Building a bike is easy,” he says, “but building a bike and keeping all the technology of the K1600 is more difficult. The biggest problem was including all the electronics, from the computers to the ABS box, and even small stuff like sensors.”

So Krugger left the electronics and engine intact, and changed pretty much everything else. And then wrapped the K1600 in bodywork that wouldn’t look out of place in the next Tron movie.

The powerhouse straight-six engine is suspended in a completely new frame—long and low, and hooked up to a new swingarm. The Duolever front suspension is heavily modified too, with only the original shock remaining.

Krugger’s inspiration was the iconic pre-War BMW R7. He’s a convert to 1930s Art Deco style, and you can see those elements in the hand-formed steel and aluminum bodywork. Which, incidentally, is not the product of CAD: Krugger uses jigs and cardboard mockups to get the lines right, taking the Japanese approach of observing where shadows fall, and playing on the contrast between light and dark.

The wheels are 21” at the front and 20” at the back, machined from American-made blanks. Krugger has installed a complete new Beringer brake system, using six-piston calipers at the front, four pistons at the back and radial master cylinders. The system is hooked up to the standard BMW ABS, which was no easy task.

The engine internals are left alone, but Krugger has relocated the radiators to the side: “It leaves the front of the engine open, to accentuate the six exhaust pipes.” The main fuel tank is now under the seat, and it’s fed by a second tank (complete with filler) in the tail unit.

The curves, surfaces and textures on this machine are quite extraordinary, and they’ve also given the bike its name: NURBS. It’s a mathematical term meaning ‘Non-Uniform Rational B-spline,’ a concept developed in the 1950s by engineers looking for a way to replicate freeform surfaces in car and ship design. (And, of course, there’s a nod to the German Nürburgring racetrack in there, too.)

Krugger’s K1600 is being unveiled tonight by BMW Motorrad France in Paris, at a custom show on the banks of the Seine. It probably won’t find favor with riders who buy the K1600 for its mile-munching abilities—but it proves that Fred Krugger remains in a league of his own when it comes to building high-concept customs.


Fonte: Bike EXIF
Site: Krugger Motorcycles

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Amândio de Aveiro
(da Madeira, que já esteve em Oeiras e agora em Oslo)
R1150 GS [2002-2013]
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Registado: 21 Abr 2008 12:05
Localização: Oslo, Norway
MensagemEnviado: 05 Jun 2015 11:07
The Lucky Cat Garage, Guerray, França

SPRINTBEEMER


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The inspiration for a bike build can come from the most unlikely of sources. In the case of this most unusual BMW sprint bike, it was a vintage M&H Racemaster drag tire.

The tire belonged to the amiable Séb Lorentz of the Lucky Cat Garage, a familiar face on the European custom show circuit. While Séb was figuring out what to do with the slick, his family provided the answer: they bought him an Airtech dustbin fairing as a present. All Séb needed now was a frame, two wheels and an engine.

Séb is not only an accomplished builder, but also works for BMW Motorrad France. And so the Sprintbeemer was born—a bike focused on speed and acceleration, with a hefty dash of style. “It has to look fast to frighten competitors,” he laughs. The goal was audacious: to win the Starr Wars sprint race at the huge Glemseck 101 festival in Germany.

Sprintbeemer is a cocktail of parts from the 50s to the 90s, with an S 1000 RR superbike battery hiding in there somewhere. The modified chassis was an R50/2 in a previous life, and the shortened fork and front stoppers have been swiped from a R75/5. Séb added an air scoop and vent holes to the drum brake, and machined the wheel hub to save weight.

The swingarm is from a BMW R100/7 and the rear end is suspended by adjustable billet aluminum struts, hidden inside vintage shock covers. Power goes through a short-ratio R60/6 transmission. The drag slick that started it all has been mounted onto an 18” Morad wheel, with an Avon Speedmaster wrapped round the 19” Excel front rim.

Séb is not sure what the tank is, though. It’s an unbranded barn find, maybe from a 1950s French or Italian sport moped. It’s been treated to a high-flow petcock, an aluminum cap and an engine temperature meter.

Just ahead are a Scitsu tachometer and Menani clip-ons—wearing black glitter Amal-style grips—and a Domino GP throttle. The aluminum seat pan is handmade, and the silver bottle just head of the rear wheel is an oil catch can—a modified emergency tank from Mooneyes in Japan.

The star of the show is the engine, though. It’s an R 100 RS motor treated to big valves, breathing through Dell’Orto PHM 40 carbs. A 336-spec cam and lightened flywheel help the motor spin up fast, and Vattier race headers hooked up to race megaphones complete the package. The clutch is essentially stock, but beefed up with an HPN ceramic plate, and the R 100 R gearbox has inverted gears for faster and easier shifting.

But just as the bike was coming together, luck ran out: Séb broke his leg badly in a BMX crash and ended up in a wheelchair. Friends rallied round to help, and Sprintbeemer was finished—the night before the journey over the border to Glemseck.

Sylvain Berneron—aka Holographic Hammer—drove Séb and his bike to Glemseck in a truck. Sylvain then donned leathers and a helmet and sent Sprintbeemer screaming down the track to victory, adding to the trophy he won on his own Suzuki at Wheels & Waves.

As winter approaches in France, Séb is rolling the BMW back into his workshop. But keep an eye out for it in the spring. With a new, shorter-ratio transmission due to be installed, Sprintbeemer promises to be even faster next year.


Fonte: Bike EXIF

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SPRINTBEEMER 2.0 - THE SPRINTBEEMER ‘FURTHERER’

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Sprintbeemer is one of the most famous custom bikes of recent years. And it goes as fast as it looks, winning the hotly contested StarrWars sprint at the 2013 Glemseck festival.

Most builders would be content to sit back on their laurels after that—but not Séb Lorentz of The Lucky Cat Garage. With the help of friends and sponsors Edwin, Furygan and Shoei, he decided to make the Sprintbeemer even faster—and more frightening.

“To take it furtherer,” as he puts it.

This time, Séb wanted to pilot the bike himself, because a BMX accident before Sprintbeemer’s Glemseck debut sidelined him with a broken leg. (The winning sprint was executed by Séb’s good friend Sylvain Berneron.)

“I had a wonderful time at Glemseck 101 despite the pain,” says Séb. “The people are really open minded and enthusiastic. So I committed to return for the next edition, and ride the Sprintbeemer myself.”

Existing mods to the brawny R100RS motor included bigger valves, Dell’Orto PHM 40 carbs, a 336-spec cam, a HPN ceramic clutch plate and a R100R gearbox. Now Séb called on Dirk at Edelweiss Motorsport to give it a more extensive engine tune.

And we do mean extensive. Dirk treated the boxer to race pistons, special cylinders with tuned D-shaped cylinder heads from a R100GS, bigger valves and a twin-spark conversion.

There’s also a modified crankshaft, special oil pump, bespoke camshaft, lightened pushrods and upgraded rocker arms. Then Edelweiss fitted a fully adjustable digital ignition system—with the rev limit set to a heady 10,000rpm.

With dollars running out fast, Séb printed up a bunch of Lucky Cat Garage T-shirts and put them on sale. In no time, he’d sold enough to fund the mod at the top of his wish list: a NOS wet injection nitrous system.

NOS systems aren’t usually installed on vintage BMWs, so the set up is completely custom. The fogger nozzles are mounted on custom-made intake manifolds, and even the fuel pump and bottle brackets are one-offs. The whole system has given the Sprintbeemer 20-25% more power.

Séb then installed an electric over air shifter for quick changes, linked to two Pingel kill modules for both the engine and NOS system. He also added a MSD shift light and a purge system to adjust the NOS pressure according to temperature.

To accommodate all the new components, the electrical system had to be rebuilt from scratch with separate fuses for everything. A Dynatek charging module had to be installed too, since the battery can only be charged by an external source: the BMW no longer has an alternator or charging system.

The Sprintbeemer’s ‘phase one’ mufflers were dumped in favor of a new pair, in the style of the BMW Rennsport items from the 1930s. They’ve been ceramic coated in a titanium grey finish, and inside each is a custom-built flamethrower system. Right.

Some original parts remain though: like the Scitsu tachometer, Menani clip-ons, Amal grips, Domino GP throttle and the modified Mooneyes oil catch can. The seat is still a bare, aluminum pan.

But the primary bodywork is all-new. Airtech Streamlining once again supplied a fiberglass dustbin fairing—this time with the addition of two “belly wings” extending under the cylinder heads. The fuel tank is from a Malagutti moped, with the oil temperature and fuel pressure gauges embedded in it, and a custom aluminum gas cap.

Séb’s friend Benny (Edwin Europe art director Machine 17) designed the fairing’s reversible triangle motif—intended to “disturb the eyes of competitors on the starting grid.” He then painted it with the help of Nico at Aerotech, who also shot the tank in candy red. The Lucky Cat Garage motto is displayed proudly on the side: “Who needs 9 lives?”

Séb’s mods paid off. At the last edition of the Glemseck 101 he donned his leathers, boarded the Sprintbeemer and successfully defended its StarrWars sprint title. And then took gold in the BMW Motorrad BoxerSprint.

To top off a fine run of success, Sprintbeemer also took second place in the retro mod class at the AMD World Championships of Custom Bike Building.

This year, Séb’s aiming for a hat trick at the Glemseck 101, as well as taking on all-comers at the Wheels & Waves and Café Racer festivals in France.

Will he find time to squeeze in a few more mods before then? We’re not taking odds on that.


Fonte: Bike EXIF

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Amândio de Aveiro
(da Madeira, que já esteve em Oeiras e agora em Oslo)
R1150 GS [2002-2013]
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Registado: 21 Abr 2008 12:05
Localização: Oslo, Norway
MensagemEnviado: 05 Jun 2015 11:42
HOLOGRAPHIC HAMMER, Paris, França

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Holographic Hammer is no stranger to the custom scene, being the render-master behind many well-known custom builds. In fact, few people realise that the man behind the Hammer works as a designer from BMW Motorrad and was the designer of the infamous and very beautiful Concept Ninety that Roland Sands went on to build for BMW. Anyway, he’s been teasing us with gorgeous bike designs for a long time now, so we were very keen to see what an influential taste-maker.

Fonte: Bike Shed

Esta facilidade em reproduzir renders muito realistas e que merecem reconhecimento internacional, tem resultado em várias colaborações com outros construtores pelo mundo fora.
Aqui ficam alguns exemplos:

R1100R - Cafe Racer Dreams
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RnineT - Bike EXIF Costum Lab
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R80RT - Untitled Motorcycles
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R1100GS - Fuel Motorcycles
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Concept 90 - Roland Sands
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Amândio de Aveiro
(da Madeira, que já esteve em Oeiras e agora em Oslo)
R1150 GS [2002-2013]
Avatar do Utilizador
Direcção BMW McP
Mensagens: 4638
Registado: 23 Jan 2008 21:41
Localização: Lisboa
MensagemEnviado: 05 Jun 2015 13:11
No final de Abril estive no evento "Art&Moto" no LXFactory, onde havia muitas criações de transformadores nacionais. Algumas muito interessantes.

http://artemoto.pt/

As BMW's antigas e também as mais recentes, como se pode ver pelos exemplos que o Amândio aqui nos trouxe, são muito procuradas para servirem de base a transformações Café Racer.

É um movimento com muita adesão na Europa e agora, também, em Portugal.

Algumas marcas, como a Triumph e a Yamaha, lançaram mesmo modelos que são já, de fábrica, Café Racer.

A NineT da BMW, é também, um pouco, uma aproximação a este conceito.

Eu, por enquanto, ainda prefiro restaurar as motas antigas à imagem do que elas eram na sua época.

Vamos ver o que acontece no futuro....
José Morgado
Sócio 237

R65 78
R100R 92
R1100RS 94
R1200RT 07
R90S 74
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